« first day (3106 days earlier)      last day (239 days later) » 

1:52 AM
I am sick and tired when people who are not in the normal spectrum of human activities are told that they have psychological issues. No. Unless they are unhappy or their behaviours are detrimental to other, they do not suffer from psychological issues. Humans are not sheep. Even sheep can live alone for many years.
You are free to choose, but if you do not choose to be like everyone else, you have psychological issues.
Let me tell you to fuck off the way you deserve!
 
 
4 hours later…
6:18 AM
ő.o
(>o.o)>
 
6:58 AM
@TelKitty Amen to that
 
7:11 AM
@StackedCrooked @ScarletAmaranth First full-episode show I've tried for this season is Kimetsu no Yaiba. Looks like a keeper. I actually screened two other shows before this, but both turned out to be half-episode shows. Though Isekai Quartet might be worth it if you've seen some of the shows that it's a parody of.
 
Cool. I'll check it out.
 
Isekai Quartet has a really catchy ED.
The show's a parody of 4 other shows - I've seen 3, so it's good enough. lol
 
 
2 hours later…
9:16 AM
> Naked environmental protesters flood House of Commons as MPs debate Brexit.12 topless protesters from Extinction Rebellion pressed their buttocks against security glass in Parliament's chamber, while many glued their hands to the screen
I wonder how the police manages to unglue those hands.
Must be bad from a dermatologist point of view.
 
people were speculating about that
acetone, they think
 
Interesting.
> Not to worry, for even though Super Glue is incredibly strong, it has one weakness: acetone. Acetone is often found in household nail polish remover, and a small amount on the end of a Q-tip or cotton swab applied directly to the glue should dissolve the bond without damaging the skin.
I suppose it's better than using a knife. :D
 
Topless protesters ... pressed their buttocks against ... snap right there, what they really pressed against the security glass were undies, not ... you know ...
Misleading journalism.
 
9:47 AM
The English language distinguishes clearly between stuff and things.
For example, we might recognize a lump of butter as the one left on the table the night before; we might pick it up, weigh it, sell it, or whatever.
This is from an A.I. book, I need to facepalm.
 
10:43 AM
 
 
6 hours later…
4:26 PM
I'll check it out, thanks for the recommendation!
 
@TelKitty Well, maybe. If they were wearing thongs, what touched the glass may well have been skin, not cloth.
 
4:55 PM
There's plenty of Youtube footage to support your claim.
 
5:17 PM
wtf
 
 
2 hours later…
7:19 PM
why are structs allowed to have initialized lists in C++ but not in C
 
they’re different languages following different though close paths
 
7:45 PM
C11, has initializer lists. Also I think the new C standard will have named lists like python function arguments.
 
 
2 hours later…
9:36 PM
cool, does anyone consider it bad to use new instead of malloc. Is there anything worth considering with respect to performance.
maybe a better question is, is it better to use free store memory or the heap.
 
@Rick in what language? In c++ you should use new but only if you absolutely have to. Otherwise you should use various RAII wrappers
you really shouldn't need to manually new anything
 
@Rick There's no real reason allocating with new should be slower. ::operator new is specified so anybody who wants to can implement it as return malloc(size);. From there, a new expression will use the ctor to initialize an object in the allocated space (or more than one, if you use new [size]). Assuming a reasonably designed ctor, that'll be initialization you want/need in any case.
 
9:58 PM
cool so no performance hit. I just find it strange that C++ treats classes and structs the same.
 
>is it better to use free store memory or the heap. "
This is the same thing. You only need to differentiate the stack(with your function calls) and the memory your OS is managing. new is asking your operating system, can I please have this?
@Rick C# was alone in making that distinction. It stopped being true for C# in 2013-2014 I think.
 
@Rick Why would it be strange that C++ doesn't create an artificial distinction between structs and classes?
 
@JerryCoffin If I'm lazy and create a virtual function in a struct. It will be a public member. This is obviously horrific and against so many patterns.
 
@CaptainGiraffe lol I sorta considered functions as non-deallocated stack frames
 
@Rick non-deallocated is that the same as allocated?
 
10:08 PM
@JerryCoffin namely because of the name, if structs were classes and why two different names
@CaptainGiraffe not deallocated when it returns
 
@Rick Sometimes I'm called Captain. Sometime they call me Giraffe Sir.
 
@Rick lucky for you C++ has a buy-2-get-1-free deal, so you can use union while you’re at it, too!
 
union { struct {} class {}}
 
@CaptainGiraffe they call that multiple personality disorder
 
joking aside, you could always think of it as procedural (not in that sense) details of what is ultimately one goal: defining datatypes
 
10:15 PM
It will be a public member...unless you make it private. Most people prefer to arrange the public stuff first, then the private stuff.
class foo {
public:
void bar();
private:
virtual void baz();
};

is equivalent to:

struct foo {
void bar();
private:
virtual void baz();
};
In fact, I'd say roughly 95% of the use of class I see does it's best to turn class into struct. Most derivation is public--the default for struct. More often than not, the opening brace of the class definition is followed immediately by public:--exactly what struct would have given them by default.
@LucDanton Friend of mine was having problems with his program using too much memory. I helped him fix it with #define class union and #define struct union. Quite effective--uses a lot less memory now (though it does still seem to have a few other bugs...)
 
@JerryCoffin That is a point I agree with 100 %;
 
A good debugger helps you there =)
So I have this data
PIP51L GKK69M CRJ03K LWC50Q MUF23X VHK65K XWB90O TPU62F GBV26Y UNC74L
How would you efficiently sort this?
It's a 2 MB file
 
sort it by what?
 
@Rick I suppose lexiographically
 
well lol you could use a heap
 
10:25 PM
@Rick sure, that would be boring though.
 
@CaptainGiraffe Given that it's only 2 MB, is there a reason you wouldn't just read them into a vector, use std::sort, and be done with it? Do you need to re-sort frequently, or something like that?
 
@JerryCoffin Lets imagine this is a competition and we timed the XXX::sort(first, last).
 
@CaptainGiraffe I think this is one of those times where the blood can't fight gravity any more Captin Giraffe
 
@Rick Jerry is full of ideas. He's just unsure whether I've already thought of it.
 
10:41 PM
@CaptainGiraffe well what's the significance of these strings
 
@Rick important but insignificant
 
@CaptainGiraffe I'm assuming you already timed it, what were the results.
 
@Rick I have, I have plenty of results. My naive improvement beat std::sort by a factor of 10.
 
@CaptainGiraffe are you using some sort of union-find?
:45976627 are you using more than one thread.
 
@CaptainGiraffe How about converting this representation GKK69M into an (unsigned) integer and then apply radix sort?
 
10:53 PM
@DanielJour That is how I got the 10x speedup.
Apparently GBV26Y is a very small integer =9
 
11:22 PM
@DanielJour what made you think to convert GKK69M into an unsigned integer
 
11:59 PM
@Rick PIP51L GKK69M CRJ03K ... are all the same length. Assuming 1 character == 1 byte this means each can be represented by 6 bytes .. so a std::uint64_t (or the fast/least variant) works to keep it.
 

« first day (3106 days earlier)      last day (239 days later) »