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1:24 AM
What is the probability of a radioactive interstellar object go pass earth at close proximity?
 
2 hours later…
3:44 AM
@TelKitty Radioactivity is relative. Essentially every atom larger than iron (atomic number 26) will probably decay eventually. But for most of them, decay is so slow we blithely ignore it. Once you've chosen your cutoff for half-life, you get a question of what percentage of it is radioactive enough to care. For example, about 120 parts per million of potassium is a radioactive isotope. Bananas contain enough potassium that they're measurably radioactive--but at a level most people don't care.
[Of course, the 120 ppm radioactivity level is for potassium found in nature on earth. A chunk of rock with potassium that was created more recently, might well have a considerably higher level.]
 
4 hours later…
8:16 AM
just about every asteroid is radioactive, given that we use radiometric dating on them
if you mean something with enough radioactivity to significantly impact life on earth, very unlikely,
 
7 hours later…
3:13 PM
 
4 hours later…
7:00 PM
posted on June 17, 2024 by Blog Staff

In this installment we are going to explore the relationships between trivial relocation and move assignments. Qt and Trivial Relocation (Part 2) by Giuseppe D'Angelo From the article: Last time we started our investigation of trivial relocation by considering an important use-case: reallocating a vector. This happens when a vector reaches its capacity, but more stor


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