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12:43 AM
@LandonZeKepitelOfGreytBritn usb port
@JerryCoffin Yeah kitten gains about 1 pound a month, in a decade she'll be over 100 pounds
 
 
2 hours later…
2:17 AM
It's still combatable - coon may have more advantageous teeth and sharper claws, but you will be heavier, and hopefully more intelligent. It's advised to get 'em young, possibly as an infant and feeble. This way, you can hug them and carry them around, feed them, train them and brain wash them into thinking that you are the provider of food, shelter, safety and the most important thing in their life.
Also a piece of rock is amongst least hackable items, it takes no input request, gives no output data, and there is no processor to be made of trojan horse of. No data to steal. You can not even log into a piece of rock!
 
 
5 hours later…
7:10 AM
@Mikhail that's what I said. There is nothing left.
I am wondering if you can DDOS into oblivion a system which has no process listening on any port. Surely, when a packet arrives there must be some IRQ that gets triggered, even if the packet just gets neglected afterwards. So some ressources at the very least will be wasted
 
 
2 hours later…
8:57 AM
Hello everyone, I would like to understand how to get RAM memory usage of a complex big C++ project of around ~10K objects and 100K function/methods.
1. I know that linker .map files needs to be generated from each executable program node. I have tried this already with MSVC, GCC and ARM Clang but this will include also allocation overhead info from the glue platform layer (windows threading, autosar, goodle protobuff, flatbuffers, arm, qxn, etc.) and OS layer calls. I would need only to compute only the heap and stacks just for non related OS and platform stacks. The map file is really ugl
I know aboud .bss .data .rdata
This just cover 10% of the whole segments....
2. MAP file is really complicated somehow to be parsed just for relevant non OS and glue overhead and just show me statistics about relevant code only.
Now I am trying to do OBJ dump on every individual object in part on each .lib (archive)
But I understand from some of my colleagues that from a single object you can really find the RAM usage statistics as this will happen only at link time and this would require a MAP file which will turn me back to point 1
Question: Is somehow possible to extract RAM and FLASH relevant information granularly only on small portions of software executable code avoiding the linker?
Thanks a lot!
 
9:18 AM
Hello everyone, I would like to understand how to get RAM memory usage of a complex big C++ project of around ~10K objects and 100K function/methods.
1. I know that linker .map files needs to be generated for each executable program node. I have tried this already with MSVC, GCC and ARM Clang but this will include also allocation overhead info from the glue platform layer (windows threading, autosar, goodle protobuff, flatbuffers, arm, qxn, etc.) and OS layer calls. I would need to compute only the heap and stacks just for non related OS and platform stacks. The map file is really ugly and
 
9:41 AM
#define UCS_PTR_IS_PTR(_ptr) (((uintptr_t)(_ptr) - 1) < ((uintptr_t)UCS_ERR_LAST - 1))
 
10:02 AM
@LXSoft what is wrong with regular memory profiling?
 
Because is including all the allocations of the OS and glue part
not pure algorithm part
For example like here:godbolt.org/z/d81v133nr
Pure allocations
    mov     DWORD PTR [rbp-4], 0
    mov     DWORD PTR [rbp-8], 0
    mov     DWORD PTR [rbp-12], 0
 
that's not an allocation, that's clearing the locals on the stack
 
How to do profiling on the algo only part with a profiler? Excluding all threading stuff
I did a test on a single main func with a while loop inf and the heap including stack in windows 10 for a process is 175K by default with MSVC profiler
But in reality my code is 0 RAM
This is the test code:
int main()
{
while (true){}
return 0;
}
 
well there you have it, get a baseline and then every bit of memory more is likely required for your program to function
 
How MSVC 2017 raport on each snapshot 175Kb
 
10:16 AM
because that is the baseline for a generic program, everything allocated above that will be required for your program
 
@ratchetfreak But the RAM usage of this would be 12 bytes
 
no because the code itself would also need to be loaded, windows always loads kernel32.dll and the CRT that is linked in by default also links in a few other dlls
 
@ratchetfreak No, If I allocate a 10Kb array the stack is still same at 175K
Windows will pre-alocate more and this don't work like expected, is RAM microbenchmarking actually possible in non-embebded systems?
 
not really
your best bet is to hook into the allocator you use and keep track of things that get allocated and freed
 
 
3 hours later…
1:22 PM
@LXSoft welcome to sharable sections, most of that is not private. Task manager only reports private bytes. Sections shared between processes are not counted. For example Chromium has a tool designed to maximize the sharable sections of chrome.dll
the above is an example of a chrome sub process, note how basically every DLL is mostly shared?
 
 
1 hour later…
2:42 PM
Thank you both for the suggestion I mixed the topics :)
Actually I considered the top level global static instance is RAM, I did sizeof on that for each global instantiated class and I have summed all of them
So heap = RAM
they were allocated through shared pointers
What I have mixed up is about stack usage which is a subcase of RAM and is really hard to be microbenchmarked
but the stack cannot exceed as far as I saw 1MB default func stack, but I needed to calculate RAM
 
 
2 hours later…
5:04 PM
@LXSoft You can collect data about all the memory used by a process-code, stack, etc. For example, here's some code to do so for a process on Windows: stackoverflow.com/a/65898991/179910. On Linux, it's a bit easier--for example, you can look in /proc/<PID>/status. This contains that PID's status. From the sound of things, you probably care about the VmHWM (Virtual memory high water mark)--the most memory that process has used.
But it also has more detail, if you care--VmEXE (memory used to store the actual executable), VmLib (memory used to store library code), VmStk (stack space), VmData (data space) and so on.
 

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