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6:51 PM
@JerryCoffin badum tsss
 
7:37 PM
does anyone have strong opinions against test-driven development?
 
nwp
8:03 PM
I've heard the argument that it kills all creativity.
That may be a feature though.
 
8:17 PM
@shintuku if used dogmatically it's dumb because it's overly constraining. But test driven development can also mean making prototypes to test something very small, then integrating what you learned and writing the unit tests
the main issue is people hear "write tests first" and they stop listening to the rest of the nuance. Which is that you should write small tests to verify things. Those don't have to be in your main codebase. Should you write unit tests for everything, usually
 
makes sense, designing a test for everything would take a lot of time, especially in the beginning when there's a very high rate of refactoring, assuming you didn't know how to plan the structure of the program
 
 
8:54 PM
@shintuku well the idea is that you'd write a prototype (AKA a test) to verify it works or not
then throw that out and write the real thing
 
9:40 PM
@Mgetz I disagree. Unit tests are mostly garbage when you are developping physical systems as they have very little added value on a business level. I would rather invest time in software end-to-end integration tests. Writing unit tests for everything is a pure loss of time.
 
10:11 PM
That's an opinion
 
Based on facts
 
Test-driven development works when it's in a field not many people have ventured on, since no rule was ever created in the field, one can only rely on tests to determine whether a product works or not.
Pretty much Edison's approach when inventing the light bulb.
 
11:01 PM
Sadness when the news section title changes from: Science -> Science & Technology -> Technology -> Business/Technology
Money can commercialise innovation, but can not increase useful innovations.
 
11:28 PM
@TelKitty At least when applied religiously as people talk about (writing tests first) my experience has been rather the opposite. It works really well when you're doing the Nth revision of something people have done dozens of times before. But when you venture into truly new ground, you have to do some "playing around" before you're at all sure what you want to accomplish. Before you can write a test, you need to know what you're trying to accomplish.
Most demos of TDD I've seen were of such trivial tasks you barely needed tests at all.
 
11:43 PM
@JerryCoffin You may not know all the details on your the criterion of your tests, but if your goal is to create something to carry out certain tasks, you already know which direction you are heading.
For example, if your goal is to create a robot to pick fruits from trees. Your initial test would be, whether the robot can indeed pick a fruit from a tree. You may then improve upon your test set to include things such as that your robot should not bruise the fruit, and only pick ripe ones.
 

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