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1:56 AM
So <concepts> seem to be working pretty well but the error messages are kinda suffering from the problems that we had with templates
Somehow mixing a static_assert with a requires clause and custom error message instructing the user what to fix would have been more useful?
Also gcc thinks const automatically satisfies constexpr for template purposes:
 
 
2 hours later…
4:21 AM
sudo pip3 install opencv-contrib-python
This command is taking forever ...
More specifically it is stuck at ' Building wheel for opencv-contrib-python (PEP 517) ... /' ... anyone had similar experience and know the possible solutions?
Also working on a 8 inch monitor is such a test for eye sight :x
 
 
3 hours later…
7:12 AM
also clang-tidy doesn't seem to quiet seem to support concepts, which is sad
 
 
1 hour later…
8:36 AM
I didn't got the topic of move semantics I meant why do we use it?
Can someone explain in plain English
 
nwp
BS explained it with smartphones. Imagine you want to move your phone from one side of the table to the other. If you ask a 5 year old they'll take the phone and move it over. If you ask a C++03 programmer they will carefully construct an exact copy of your phone on the other side of the table and then smash your old phone into pieces.
If you squint at it right you can see how the C++03 programmer kinda sorta "moved" it, but it's extremely inefficient. So they added the 5 year old approach of properly moving things.
I can't find the video anymore. It goes on to show with the example of moving an std::vector in C++03 where you can see how a copy is created and the original is destroyed and the same in C++11 where 6 pointers are bent and the data is not needlessly copied and destroyed.
 
9:00 AM
Well, not sure how you can really 'move' anything, when basically everything is stored in computer as 0s and 1s.
All you need to do is to re-arrange 1s and 0s in a section of storage.
 
nwp
9:21 AM
Moving is just rearranging atoms in a 3D space. The analogy holds.
 
The periodic table, also known as the periodic table of elements, is a tabular display of the chemical elements, which are arranged by atomic number, electron configuration, and recurring chemical properties. The structure of the table shows periodic trends. The seven rows of the table, called periods, generally have metals on the left and nonmetals on the right. The columns, called groups, contain elements with similar chemical behaviours. Six groups have accepted names as well as assigned numbers: for example, group 17 elements are the halogens; and group 18 are the noble gases. Also displayed...
 
 
1 hour later…
10:41 AM
Does the ~ Sign Before The Destructor Is Just Used To Signify That It's An Destructor Is It So? Or it means something else
 
nwp
It's the complement operator. It inverts the constructor :D
 
 
5 hours later…
3:57 PM
^ Nice rainbow that I could see from my balcony yesterday.
One question though: would it be dangerous to stand on this balcony during lightning?
I guess it's on the dangerous side, but then again, there's probably other stuff around me that's higher than me and is a better conductor. Like the metal balcony separators.
 
 
1 hour later…
5:11 PM
 
@StackedCrooked Probably. Silly statistic though: at least in the US, males put themselves in danger of lightning strike enough more than women that more than three fourths of all deaths by lightning strike are males.
 
5:49 PM
@JerryCoffin I've seen that video many times. Yeah, it's a really boring one.
 
@StackedCrooked So many people so little originality. But if it's boring, why do you keep watching it?
 
@JerryCoffin It's not that I want to watch it. It's just that when I stumble upon it it's over really fast.
@JerryCoffin That's a pity. I really like to watch the lightning.
If only I were a female.
 
@StackedCrooked Yeah, had kind of that Rickrolled feel to it.
@StackedCrooked Then you could continue what you're doing, and help balance the statistics!
 
@JerryCoffin Hehe, that's kinda true.
> Females had comparatively fewer deaths than men in every category, with their highest percentages in the boating-related activities (33%) and routine daily/weekly activities (32%).
Boating?
When they mention daily activities I imagine hanging up laundry. I must have watched too many Ghibli movies (depicting women hanging up laundry, not being struct by lightning.)
 
6:04 PM
@StackedCrooked Sure. Riding around in boats, and (often) skiing behind them. Out in the middle of a lake (or wide river), you're the tallest thing around...
People are stupid in general though. Where I grew up as a kid, there were fairly frequent tornadoes. They had sirens to make sure people knew to get to shelter--and as soon as those went off, quite a few people immediately went outside to see if they could see the funnel cloud...
 
@JerryCoffin Yeah, but still, I would have expected that standing in a large field is more common cause of lightning strikes.
 
And no, I don't mean to claim I'm any better--I was often out there with the rest of them.
 
@JerryCoffin So would I.
 
@StackedCrooked It does kind of surprise me how many people apparently go boating. Not something I've ever done enough to notice.
A couple friends ours did have boats. One especially made her definition of a boat very clear: "a boat is a hole in the water you pour money into."
 
That's a strange way of phrasing it but I guess her point is clear.
Or more like a nonsensical way of phrasing it.
Or maybe I'm missing something...
A common thing you see in dolphin shows is how they are able to stand up in the water. It was discovered that when these dolphins are released in the wild they teach the wild dolphins this trick. I wonder if any of them got struck by lightning.
I mean being drenched in salty water makes them an excellent conductor.
 
6:35 PM
@StackedCrooked Just that boats are apparently extremely expensive to maintain (or at least the boat they had was), I think.
@StackedCrooked You would have to think. Question is whether they do that when the weather's crappy.
 
@JerryCoffin Hm, a quick Google search says no.
> It has been suggested that coastal dolphins can sense changes in atmospheric pressure, heading for deeper, less turbulent waters before the bad weather hits.
Not sure if I am supposed to feel relieved or disappointed.
 
@StackedCrooked Obviously Dolphins are smarter than humans.
...or maybe just less adventurous.
 
@JerryCoffin That might be true. Ismo also mentioned this.
Humans are so overpowered in this game.
 
@StackedCrooked The wonders of hands!
 
Yeah. Large hands are even considered an advantage to procreation, or so I've heard...
 
6:49 PM
Many years ago (long enough that my mom would have been quite upset if she'd known) I read part of a book that went into some detail about how masturbation was mankind's highest philosophical achievement. That masturbation is really the biggest separation between humans and other animals. Yes, some monkeys will masturbate when near (but separated from) females, but quit when no female is near. But humans will continue to masturbate no matter how long they've been separated from the opposite sex.
 
@JerryCoffin I assume you found that book in the library?
 
@StackedCrooked As I recall, one of my older brothers had borrowed it from the library.
 
As a kid I was always at the library reading parts of random books. I can certainly imagine reading weird passages like that.
But, how is masturbation a philosophical achievement. I doesn't even involve thinking... I mean it does, but that's not what I mean.
Anyway, there's been many strange ideas put forth by authors. I even recall reading a book that said Noah's arc was real.
 
@StackedCrooked Honestly, it's a bit like you said: I read a page or two in the middle of the book, and didn't read the rest. But I think the whole argument was that it was a way in which we differed from other animals.
@StackedCrooked When I was a kid (going to a Catholic school) they took us to a movie that tried to argue that it was, with these blurry pictures of a brown spot on a mountain they purported to be the remains of the arc. Pretty sure if the nuns had know what I was thinking during it, I'd have gotten punished pretty severely (but fortunately, I was old enough to know better than to let them know).
 
@JerryCoffin I think there was a trend in psychology in the latter half of the 20th century where every behavior was explained in terms of sex. I was subscribed to a magazine for magicians, and in one of them there was an article on how all magic tricks are a form of sexual symbolism. Sure if you are creative enough in drawing analogies then everything is sexual.
 
7:05 PM
@StackedCrooked Goes back a lot further than that--at least as far as Freud. But I'm pretty sure Freud probably didn't believe more than 10% of what he said. He spent time listening women tell about how boring their lives were, and was smart enough to realize that telling them titillating stories lead to more profits.
And interpreting their dreams as all being about sex was an easy way to do that.
@StackedCrooked Doing a quick look, I'll bet this must be the movie: imdb.com/title/tt0076182 I saw.
 
> the most amusing story is that of two atheists that were led up by a Christian and saw it. They became so outraged they wanted to destroy it and kill the Christian! But... one asked the other "If we kill him how will we find our way back...?" so they spare this hapless person's life in exchange for his guidance and silence! Yea right! "How will we get back?"
 
7:26 PM
@StackedCrooked Hmm...I don't even recall that detail. I was about to say it wasn't much of a movie, but then again I do recall seeing it--and about the only other movie I can recall seeing around that time is Star Wars.
Then again, I'm not really sure how much of the movie itself I really remember. Thinking about it, what I recall more clearly than anything else was my reaction to some of my classmates, who basically took it as absolute truth that it had to be there, simply because a narrator in a movie said so.
 

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