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12:25 AM
@JerryCoffin Get the film scanned and make a trip then you can compare how it aged
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix Not worth it (IMO). Good film scanning is expensive (and most of this was shot on Fuji Velvia, so if it's going to be done at all, it deserves really good scanning).
Some was also shot on Kodachrome, which I liked a lot, but doesn't work well at all for scanning.
 
Depends what you need the scan for, but you should be able to scan negatives using normal scanner
Unless you want to print a A2 or A1 size you should get something reasonable
 
These aren't negatives, they're slides. I wouldn't use a page scanner in any case--I have a dedicated slide scanner. But even that's far inferior to what you can get with a good drum scanner. Biggest problem isn't spatial resolution, it's color. Fuji Velvia is very high in both contrast and saturation. Shooting with it was tricky, and good scans of it are difficult as well.
Having said that, there is also quite a bit of difference in sharpness. Most page scanners are really only good for around 2400 DPI at best. My slide scanner does 5400 DPI, but a good drum scanner can do 8000 DPI or so--and Fuji Velvia had fine enough grain to make good use of all that.
 
12:45 AM
@JerryCoffin umm, you should develop them. Those are historical documents now, not just pictures. Why would you go back there, there are plenty of modern pictures online. Unless you are looking for an excuse to go. In which case you should just go but I would suspect there are other places more worthy of visiting.
 
@Rick You mean get the film developed? I did that long ago. But it's a slide in a box, which isn't very convenient for viewing and such.
 
what do you mean by slides?
negative in a cardboard?
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix No, it's positive, not negative, in a cardboard or plastic holder. stevehuffphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/P1011362.jpg
Normally viewed via a slide projector, which shines light through the slide, then through a lens to focus it on a screen. Fairly routine to view a 35mm slide (24x36mm film) enlarged to 2x3 meters or so.
 
If I am going, to be honest. I would not develop or visit. It does not seem very inspiring to me. But these are just my tastes. My personal opinion is architecture these days sucks. I would personally visit Rome, Greece, Russia, and Turkey if I wanted to see awe-inspiring architecture.
 
Ah I see, it should still be possible to scan with a flatbed scanner, I had a scanner with negative slots and possibly also those kind of slides. But I guess you'd stil have to do some post processing to fix light intensity
It's not something you can easily control with a cheap scanner
 
12:56 AM
Maybe France and Germany but I have never been a fan of gothic architecture
 
@Rick That is curiously shaped like texas.
 
@CaptainGiraffe it feels like texas sometimes
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix Even the cheap scanners are quite good at normalizing stuff. It takes a lot of time though.
 
I guess newer ones are even better, this one I had in 2005-2008
 
12:59 AM
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix My dad spent 9 weeks with a negative scanner to "the important ones". It was similar to the Canon 4400
 
I also think American architecture is underrated, I think it is very much in the spirit of the classical form.
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix I'm not sure there are any new ones. Nikon (for one example) discontinued all their slide scanners years ago. It's harder to sort things out with Canon--they have some current products, but it looks like they're all page scanners. Minolta used to make slide scanners as well, but as far as I know, they were dropped when Sony bought out their camera business.
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix It's possible, but as I already pointed out, I've done scans with a dedicated film scanner, which works much better for slides than any flat bed scanner of which I'm aware.
 
1:29 AM
Maybe a simile will put things in perspective. Fuji Velvia was the equivalent of, say, a Formula 1 car in its day. The best of its type, regardless of price. The scanner I have now is roughly at the level of, say, a (stock) Maserati or Ferrari--something a normal consumer can buy, but only a few really dedicated enthusiasts will even consider.
A flat bed scanner for film would be something like a Honda Civic or Toyota Camry--solid, dependable and versatile, but not a particularly viable option for somebody trying to decide whether to move up from their Ferrari.
 
I have always wanted to buy the Nikon D5 DSLR
 
@Mysticial @ScarletAmaranth Just saw Vinland Saga's first episode. And damn, it's really good. It speaks to the soul.
 
@StackedCrooked I'm assuming it doesn't say much :-o
 
@Rick Definitely a nice camera, but about the only way I'd consider a new SLR right now would be if I already had at least a few lenses to fit it. Otherwise, I'd go with a mirrorless system.
 
Lenses are worth their weight in gold, and that would be an understatement.
I don't understand why they are so expensive. I would think manufacturing would have improved by now.
 
1:43 AM
I always just used my phones. A lot of the times, there are little time to take out the camera, setting every thing right before taking the photo (popular touristy photo shoot point, wildlife picture opportunities).
 
1:54 AM
Interestingly, even when the design has leaked the lenses are still expensive, hinting that some of the components are expensive.
 
@Rick It has to some extent, but more often than not, the result is that they include more esoteric "stuff" like aspherical elements and low-dispersion glass in "consumer" grade lenses, when 30 or 40 years ago, those were only used in a few really expensive lenses.
@Rick Well, a bit of an exaggeration. If it were true, I could retire by just selling my heaviest lens.
 
this still seems a little expensive, by now much are they raising the bar exactly.
 
@JerryCoffin Yes I get that, but like many things scanning is one part of the job, if you have a shitty printer, a good or bad scan won't make much difference
You could potentially cheat a bit to increase the DPI resolution of scan by moving the frame and scanning multiple times then merge the results a bit like DSLR can "simulate" long exposure by taking many pictures that are going to be post processed into one
longest exposure I can have with my NikonD5300 is 30s but you can set to take pictures every 30s for 30s
I heard the issue is related how the matrix will heat overtime and introduce noise if exposure is longer. You could use a remote that will act as a trigger to bypass the 30s limit but it's not recommended
my biggest issue is that I have thousands of pictures but nowhere to print them
Is photo paper water resistant like real photos?
 
2:20 AM
The side where you print your photo on is.
 
3:00 AM
@StackedCrooked is the anime extension just a filter, and what's the rating based on imdb
also, I don't think it works
 
 
1 hour later…
4:16 AM
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix I routinely do exposures up to 5 minutes or so, and at least most of the time, my limit is how dark the sky is, not sensor heating. Oh, and this is with a sensor that's extremely noisy by modern standards (Sony A900). Actually, this Saturday a friend and I are going to drive up into the mountains to a much darker site, so I'll probably do some shots in the 15 or 20 minute range (and I expect the limit will still be how dark the sky is, not sensor noise).
One minor point though: I do shoot at low ISO (100). At higher ISO (more amplification) noise would probably become a problem much sooner.
 
4:53 AM
Of course image stacking to further reduce noise can be (is) useful as well. I pretty routinely do (for example) a stack of 3 of 4 frames of, say, five minutes apiece to get a total of 15 or 20 minutes, along with a couple of dark frames to help compensate for noise.
For example, here's an image of M31 and M32 taken from my back yard on August fifth and sixth.
 
Amazing.
 
@TelKitty Assuming things go well Saturday night, I may have something better to show...
 
@JerryCoffin you should shoot from big bear.
 
@Rick Could be interesting, but it's a lot longer trip. The place we're going is only about an hour away, and still gets pretty dark.
 
As a kid I remember go up there camping In the winter, the sky is ablaze at night.
 
5:15 AM
@Rick Yup. For that matter, if you don't mind an even longer drive, the view at night from Death Valley can be truly spectacular. It gets to the point that you feel kind of lost--so many stars are visible that it's hard to pick out the ones you're accustomed to using as guides to what parts of the sky are where. Sometimes went to a pretty dark site in Colorado that caused the same problem (though it's even pronounced in Death Valley).
 
@JerryCoffin interesting, I would have never thought death valley would be a good place for star gazing.
I thought higher elevations made of ideal conditions less atmosphere, but it's probably the light pollution from the cities that's the key hindrance
 
@Rick It has two major advantages. First of all, it's nearly 200 miles to the nearest city (Las Vegas), which helps keep the sky quite dark. Second, the air is so dry that it does less to scatter light and such. Probably also helps that it is, well, a valley, so there are mountains to help keep out light from the cities.
@Rick Ideally, you'd like minimal light and high altitude. And if you're willing to travel a really long ways, you can get that combination (e.g., Mauna Kea, Hawaii). But just for example, Mount Palomar used to be one of the best observatories on earth--but it's now so light polluted that it's used almost strictly as a solar observatory.
I suspect in the case of Death Valley, the dryness of the air does a lot to make up for the low altitude.
 
Death valley has just been added on to my to do list.
 
@Rick There's some pretty spectacular photography during the day there as well (but it's definitely a place you want to have an experienced guide to help get to the right places, as well as helping ensure you don't forget any of the minor things like lots of water so you don't end up getting buried there).
 
5:33 AM
@JerryCoffin there is a travel guide I usually buy that's really good for these types of things. You mean hire a guide for like a weekend
 
@Rick Yes--I've heard from multiple sources that it's well worth it (but obviously not exactly cheap).
 
I do hear about people dieing out there. It might not be a bad idea lol, it does remove some of the excitement of getting lost, but I'm sure it will be responsible if you go as a large group .
 
 
2 hours later…
7:39 AM
 
^ Now do an AVX512 version
 
Is the following solution possible with multi-threading in C++? At some point in a program, 2 or more threads are dispatched. When one returns, the other thread may terminate, and the rest of the program can continue. Is this possible? For example a certain file is being searched for in more than 1 location, so once it's found the rest of the threads can be terminated and the remainder of the program can continue.
 
Sure. but I suspect your question is more complicated.
 
6
Q: Execute competing calculations in parallel and discard all but the first one that finishes

fredoverflowI wrote a function that generates a labyrinth based on randomness. Most of the time, this function is very fast. But every once in a while, due to bad luck with the random numbers, it takes a couple of seconds. I would like to start this function multiple times in parallel and let the fastest fu...

somewhat related I guess
 
@Mikhail would it be as simple as that? once one thread found "the solution" it will terminate the other still running ones (amusing they haven't exited naturally)
 
7:52 AM
Note that terminating a thread from the outside is considered bad practice.
 
hence the question...what's the better solution?
 
Use a shared boolean flag that the threads use to communicate with each other and check it periodically.
Then the second thread can end itself gracefully.
(Unlike terminators, threads can end themselves.)
 
For many longer operations (200 ms+) using std::async, isn't a bad idea
 
@northerner Are the files on the same physical hard drive? In that case, parall searches are probably going to slow you down.
 
no they wouldn't be
 
8:02 AM
yes they would because seek latency is aweful and every time a different thread kicks of a directory read it needs to seek
 
come on now
 
know your bottleneck and program around that
 
From personal experience, I've found that the best strategy is to have a producer consumer style tree traversal, where the producer pushes the leafs to be traversed to the consumer. Importantly, if the amount of work items delivered to the producer exceeds some threshold (for example 8 threads working on crawling), then the producer is also responsible for consuming. As I work with largish (80 drives) JBOD arrays, this strategy makes good use of the many drives in the JBOD.
Its actually the only way to get the "spec-ed" performance of the JBOD
Another important point, is that when you have a single drive, and not much indirection you don't really loose too much performance. From experience, even the single drive case, using multiple threads improves the performance over the single thread case by a dozen or so percentage points (walltime)
 
 
5 hours later…
1:20 PM
 
1:46 PM
Anyone here ever got trolled by technical recruiters?
 
 
4 hours later…
5:32 PM
@Mikhail One more point: depending on OS (and possibly other factors) a breadth first search can be faster that a depth-first search (and I've never seen it come out slower).
 
 
1 hour later…
6:36 PM
@JerryCoffin Nice photo. I have still a lot to learn. I guess here in Canada it's easier to get good shots at night. We have lots of mountains.
And light pollution seems not as bad as it was when I was a kid.
 
@LoïcFaure-Lacroix Lots of mountains, and (probably more importantly) a lot less light pollution.
 
6:51 PM
I also believe somehow, I live on a special spot where anytime we see a rainbow, it's always a complete half circle
Except I don't have lense wide enough to make a real good picture and android panorama kinda suck
 
 
2 hours later…
8:50 PM
oh and another point about IO, if you have a loop like for (auto image:{}) {image.write_jpeg()}; often the JPEG-ing or similar represents a non trivial computation that benefits from task parallelism .
So, everybody that says IO can't be parallelized is wrong and should be shot.
 
I could have told you that, but getting shot seems harsh.
 
 
1 hour later…
9:55 PM
@Mikhail The mere fact that in your source code it happens to masquerade as I/O doesn't mean that computation actually is I/O.
@Rick Maybe just "should do a shot".
 
that is definitely preferable to "getting shot"
I was wondering if you need multiple copies of a map, what's the best way to handle that
when you don't know ahead of time how many copies you will need.
because if you initialize a variable inside a for loop it's lost once it moves out of scope
and you need to have the object as a reference
if(len < sets.size()){
unordered_map < int, int > st;
for (auto e: list) {
st[e]++;
}
Queue.push({key, st});
}
I feel ill have to push it into a vector and then pull it out just to put into a Queue, this seems like a roundabout way of doing it. but maybe I'm just lazy
 
10:53 PM
@JerryCoffin yeah but my other fucking point was that io devices have many levels of indirection. Even the fucking disk head in a fragmented drive is only optimal when it's saturated with data. Aka so the head is constantly writing while moving.
You can std::move it, emplace bad.
 
@Mikhail Oh, I quite agree that now that essentially all disks have some sort of command queuing issuing more commands sooner so there are always commands in its queue will almost always improve performance, not hurt it. Even before that, I suspect (but never checked to be sure) that at least some drivers kept their own command queue, and sorted commands based on head positions and such, so they provided roughly the same effect.
That was harder though, because in quite a few cases, even the driver had only a rather vague notion of the physical layout of the disk (or worse, "thought" it knew an exact layout, but was wrong).
 
11:11 PM
I don't see the connection between std::move and emplace. They seem like two different things to me.
@JerryCoffin I agree breadth-first search is better, they even come with the advantage of being thread-safe (this is mostly speculation on my part). But they are much harder to implement expecially domains occupied by DFS .
especially in*
 
11:50 PM
@Rick Both involve rvalue references.
@Rick I don't find them noticeably more difficult to implement. I don't think BFS guarantees thread safety by nature, but does make it fairly easy to do things in a thread-safe way.
Consider something like walking a directory tree. To do DFS, you have something like: for (node : current_directory) if (node.isDirectory()) search(node); To do a BFS, you instead have something like: for (node : current_directory) if (node.isDirectory()) searchQueue.push(node);
 
that's a simple example, how about permutation where you need to generate the tree nodes on your own.
I would think you would need to share data among the nodes that touch.
 

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