« first day (3144 days earlier)      last day (31 days later) » 

12:05 AM
That feel when you add the Wilhelm Scream to your assets, only to realize its already there.
 
 
3 hours later…
3:24 AM
I wonder how much info is airbnb stealing. After used their services twice, they are still asking for more sensitive information.
 
3:54 AM
airbnb is now asking for drivers license pictures - both sides, I wonder how likely is their database get hacked and you suddenly become indebted because identity fraudulence?
We all know how often those kind of database getting hacked.
 
4:51 AM
 
 
5 hours later…
9:35 AM
The saiga antelope (, Saiga tatarica) is a critically endangered antelope that originally inhabited a vast area of the Eurasian steppe zone from the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains and Caucasus into Dzungaria and Mongolia. They also lived in Beringian North America during the Pleistocene. Today, the dominant subspecies (S. t. tatarica) is only found in one location in Russia (in the Republic of Kalmykia and Astrakhan Oblast) and three areas in Kazakhstan (the Ural, Ustiurt, and Betpak-Dala populations). A proportion of the Ustiurt population migrates south to Uzbekistan and occasional...
Amazed to learn another piece of knowledge about some 'weird' creature that I will probably never use.
 
 
3 hours later…
12:40 PM
@TelKitty you might not but somebody else might.
 
 
1 hour later…
2:01 PM
is it possible to create a tree node on the stack
 
 
2 hours later…
3:43 PM
@Rick depends, do you consider placement-new into a fixed-size buffer or into a alloca-allocated buffer an option?
 
@PeterT anything with new will place into the heap. As long as it's allocated on the stack I don't care. I just don't want it on the heap.
 
you can placement-new into stack space
 
@PeterT how
struct TreeNode
{
    int val;
    TreeNode *left;
    TreeNode *right;
    TreeNode(int x) : val(x), left(NULL), right(NULL) {}
};
@PeterT this is the tree node how would you do that?
 
char memory[sizeof(TreeNode)]; TreeNode* my = new(memory) TreeNode(5);
 
@PeterT but new will put that on the heap.
 
3:50 PM
no
I specifically used new(memory) to place it into the memory allocated by the variable memory
just read up on placement-new if you don't know what it does
 
@PeterT so in this case, it will be destroyed once it goes out of scope and the instruction set it minimal? I am worried about performance from my understanding new does a lot of accounting under the hood.
 
what accounting? Placement-new does not allocate new memory, it only calls the constructor for you
it won't be automatically destroyed, you need to call the destructor yourself
but do not call delete on something you placement-new'd
 
Rick, placement new is zero overhead. It literally just calls the constructor
 
4:05 PM
@PeterT thanks, I am guessing the reason you used char was for the padding.
 
no I used char because I think that's the only type the standard technically allows
for memory laundering essentially
 
@PeterT thanks this helped a lot.
 
4:33 PM
@PeterT one last thing, I get operator new does not match the argument list.
 
@Rick did you include the <memory> header?
 
@PeterT yes
 
not sure what the issue is then gcc.godbolt.org/z/wVWiJK
apparently <new> is the actual header
 
@PeterT it works, it's just that my ide reports it as an error.
thx again :)
 
 
2 hours later…
6:56 PM
-2
Q: Dynamic one-dimensional array linear search

DigJohnI'm trying to make one-dimensional dynamic array.Here's the code. int main() { int size; int value; std::cin >> size; //array size std::cin >> value; int* array = new int[size]; for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) { if (array[i] == value) { return i; } } delete[] array; ...

/cc @Mysticial @milleniumbug I cant even
 
wtf?
lol
 
@Borgleader lol
 
I'm not sure whats a worse mess, the question or the comments
Well I filled the array with sequent natural number with last number=size,so it wasn't about no values in my array as you said,so thank you 278.... — DigJohn 8 mins ago
thats literally what i said and yet they thank the other person
 
@Borgleader user 2785528 has 10 years of experience
 
 
1 hour later…
8:28 PM
@Rick That's in base 0, right?
 
@Puppy of course, it's in base 0. If it wasn't it wouldn't make any sense :P
that was a double-entendre. It only makes sense when it makes no sense.
 
9:07 PM
dam vectors! you have to know to use reserve and you have to know to use emplace otherwise it just screws you on performance. das ist stupid!
 
10:04 PM
 
@Mikhail No AVX512 = trash. :)
OTOH, the 16-core Zen2 looks interesting.
I wanna see how bad the memory bottleneck is.
And how good it is for compiling.
 
Or if it will be nerfed for ICC
@Mysticial I can't figure out what is the theoretical justification for IBM to push the power aritechture?
 
When is AMDs presentation at computex? plz say tomorrow
Cant wait for 3rd party benchmarks, once I get those new PC build time
 
@Borgleader Tomorrow in Taiwan time. Which is late tonight.
 
The system consists of 16 IBM POWER9 AC922 servers with four  The system consists of 16 IBM POWER9 AC922 servers with four NVIDIA V100 GPUs preserver, all nodes interconnected with dual-channel EDR IB network and provides IBM PowerAI software stack with optimized Caffe, PyTorch, and TensorFlow deep learning frameworks. WNVIDIA V100 GPUs preserver, all nodes interconnected with dual-channel EDR IB network...
 
10:10 PM
@Mysticial Neat
Oh and uh since youre an expert in this
how hard is it to pull off a black&white component + purple lighting rig?
 
@Borgleader Very doable.
Most RGB components are neutral in color
 
Sweet
 
So just pick parts that are black and white. Most RGB stuff is clear or transparent for obvious reasons.
I'm thinking of a small mATX RGB build with the 16-core Zen 2 - assuming that's a thing.
It could be a good low-power work horse for running all my non-AVX512 tests (which take longer anyway).
 
Also known as a space heater
 
10:30 PM
That would be pretty neat. The case that I'm looking would be the smallest ever build I've ever done.
To get that much heat out of a tiny box.
 
10:43 PM
@Borgleader Also, do some research on the RGB itself. See what your mobo supports (12V DC RGB or addressable or both). Make sure the parts you choose can plug into the mobo.
Then you can set them all to the same shade of purple controlled by the mobo.
 
Hmmm, thx I'll look into that
 
Though TBH, it's actually harder than it looks. I've done 2.5 RGB so far and I'm having trouble picking parts for the 3rd.
The biggest problem is that there's no RGB standard. So every vendor tends to lock you into their components and their controllers.
Then you have unexpected things such as mismatching brightness and overall unexpected lighting issues.
 
RIP
they should USB that shit ASAP
 
For example, my Trident Z RGB ram doesn't look good in my first RGB build because the ram RGB is far too bright that it blinds everything else. Dimming down the ram a bit makes it look weird and it isn't persistent across reboots - IOW it needs to be software controlled.
RGB strips are terrible when in plane sight. Because they have a lot of light concentrated in a small place where the light is generated. So it's actually blinding. You need to put them out of sight and use them to light the case via scattering.
RGB strips have the R, G, and B components in slightly different places on the strip itself. So to generate white light, it turns on all 3. But since the sources aren't exactly overlayed, at some angles, you don't see exactly white light.
The best solution I've found for that is also to keep the out of direct line of sight as scattering will usually mix the colors up better.
The bottom of the mobo (below the video card) tends to be darker than the top - especially if you have RGB fans on top and RGB ram.
It's not easy to get light to the bottom as there aren't many components down there that can be RGB'ed. So you'll need a bright RGB PSU, or one of those Gigabyte boards with PCI RGB.
Some cases let you mount SSDs in plane sight at the bottom. So you can put an RGB SSD down there.
And you can't really use RGB strips to light the bottom since they'll be in plane sight.
 
11:06 PM
Hi everyone
Just a quick noobish inquiry,
 
Your question will be better received if it includes references to RGB
2
 
sorry
If i have a variable created in the main thread, spinning off a node.js worker thread, will I still be able to modify / access these variables from both threads?
 
11:20 PM
@Mysticial You saw this right? anandtech.com/show/14380/…
 
There is a reason why that CPU/processor sits in a desktop instead of a laptop.
 
11:35 PM
@TelKitty because it makes it arrow dynamic
 
11:52 PM
So, to ensure thread safety for my buffer owning classes ("buffer holder?"), I've started to use something like a getter, but instead of returning a value, I pass a lambda to it. For example, void thread_safe_get(const std::function<void(buffer&)>& getter_function). For the duration of the callback I hold a mutex. Is this the road to madness?
Perhaps an alternative is to somehow have your getter return two values, one of them is a unique_lock/lock_guard and the other is the protected buffer.
 
I have a preference for not returning anything, I think your first approach is best. But I'm not an expert at multithread operations.
 

« first day (3144 days earlier)      last day (31 days later) »