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2:33 AM
@Morwenn
 
 
2 hours later…
4:31 AM
How much information are we losing by capture this 3D world in 2D pictures?
 
 
1 hour later…
5:45 AM
Negative score ... :x
 
 
5 hours later…
11:03 AM
Meta reminds me of Stanford prison experiment, but in real life and not being an experiment.
The Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) was a social psychology experiment that attempted to investigate the psychological effects of perceived power, focusing on the struggle between prisoners and prison officers. It was conducted at Stanford University on the days of August 14–20, 1971, by a research group led by psychology professor Philip Zimbardo using college students. In the study, volunteers were randomly assigned to be either "guards" or "prisoners" in a mock prison, with Zimbardo himself serving as the superintendent. Several "prisoners" left mid-experiment, and the whole experiment was...
 
11:28 AM
Actually this kind of situation is more common than people realised, another real life event of Standford Prison Experiment is the:
The Cultural Revolution, formally the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, was a sociopolitical movement in the People's Republic of China from 1966 until 1976. Launched by Mao Zedong, then Chairman of the Communist Party of China, its stated goal was to preserve Chinese Communism by purging remnants of capitalist and traditional elements from Chinese society, and to re-impose Mao Zedong Thought (known outside China as Maoism) as the dominant ideology in the Communist Party of China. The Revolution marked Mao's return to a position of power after a period of less radical leadership to recover...
The title is misleading, it's a period when no one gets higher education and tens of millions of people starved to death.
But people are still okay with that!
 
If you're looking for historical examples, there's obviously plenty. One that's often cited because it basically has a "control group" is the GDR during Germanys split into two states
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stasi One of its main tasks was spying on the population, mainly through a vast network of citizens turned informants
 
I don't understand why people do not rebel when they are that repressed.
 
Well if you have enough covert surveilance and a culture of punishment for not reporting on your fellow citizens it's hard to a proper rebellion started
Since you controlled enough of the media at that time you could surpress uprisings locally very well. Even if a whole city rebelled you could sweep it under a rug or give a false narrative about it
And if you do Rebel it's still not a guarantee of a betterment. You could end up like in Egypt and replace one authoritarian Regime with the next. You can't do violent revolution 24/7/365, otherwise you'll just end up starving
 
True, but between starve to death and fight to death, I would rather die with a full tummy and with hope.
 
Well let's just hope we never get tested in that manner
 
11:43 AM
The development of internet is good for at least one thing: authority has even shorter period during which they can hide things from the public.
 
so this answer has -10 and +5, yet it shows up as 0 total vote count.
2
 
It shows -1 to me.
 
You might be one of the guinea pigs: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/390178/…
Also, for me it's -5
 
right I just read it, thanks
thats actually ridiculous
 
@SombreroChicken I am more curious why you see 0 and I see -1. The obvious difference being my rep is between 1000-9999 and yours is above that.
So the people with more reps (assumed more knowledge) sees higher score?
 
11:54 AM
@TelKitty Have you downvoted it yourself? Perhaps it's only showing your downvote?
 
@SombreroChicken I have not, and the user who asked this question has a rep between 1000-9999 and saw -1
 
They seem to have different "groups"
So some see different values than others
Might be completely random? Not sure, would be weird if they were using some algorithm so select who needs to participate :)
 
If they do not know their guinea pigs how do they measure their results?
I mean they can randomly select test objects but they still need to know something about those test objects before they can measure the effect on them.
 
12:36 PM
OMG I read that question again and realised that I missed the part where the user saw 0 before.
 
@SombreroChicken I'm also one of the guinea pigs
 
nwp
This is a great idea in a chain of successful company decisions. I propose next we randomize privileges and accidentally click Mystical's rep.
4
 
@nwp I'm sure he wouldn't mind sharing some of his rep with us
 
No you misunderstand
Mysticial doesn't reset the accumulated rep counter (the green thing)
Except when he accidentally clicks on it
Mine is sitting at +3472 (my rep doesnt go up nearly as quickly)
 
nwp
You should check what happens when you click on the number of bronze badges. I think that is a new effect.
 
12:50 PM
This lounge is great, feels like we are bunch of dirty labourers waiting to see a well dressed fellow to fall into a mud pond.
 
I will not
 
Where is that bronze badge so that I can click on it :)
 
1:08 PM
 
 
3 hours later…
4:32 PM
@Borgleader I've never quite understood how he can put up with that putrid shade of green. I actually started on an auto-clicker at one point, so I'd never have to see that ugly green polluting my page.
 
4:48 PM
Oh, I understand now. Been a while since I gained any rep, I suspect that might be it.
 
 
1 hour later…
6:12 PM
@JerryCoffin Wouldnt it be simpler to just hide the dom element?
 
 
1 hour later…
7:34 PM
@Borgleader Might easily be. Although I fail at times, I do my best to remain ignorant of web stuff.
 
@Mikhail Any recommendations for 14/16TB drives (non-SMR)?
Something like this? newegg.com/p/N82E16822234360
It's Helium, but I can't tell if it's SMR or the new laser thing. Not sure if I want to trust the laser stuff yet.
 
@Mysticial SMR?
 
7:49 PM
@Mgetz Shingled Magnetic Recording
 
oh right the high read low write drives
 
And why the fuck do these HDs have TBW ratings? Do they use solid state cache?
 
@Mysticial TBW?
 
@Mgetz Terabytes of writes. Usually given to SSDs.
 
@Mysticial guessing the SMR gets messed up eventually?
 
7:55 PM
@Mgetz I don't think these are SMR drives.
 
I didn't think there was anything above 3 TB that wasn't SMR?
 
Nah, most of the non-Seagate large drives are not SMR.
 
8:28 PM
@Mysticial Latest JBOD used these guys, had zero problems amazon.com/Toshiba-14TB-SATA-7200RPM-Enterprise/dp/B07DHY61JP
The 16TB drive seems to be pretty good (storagereview.com/node/7597). Personally, I'm okay with anything except Western Digital.
This opinion is echoed by these failure rates. A high annual failure rate (AFR) is bad.
 
9:07 PM
@Mikhail I wonder how much of a discount you get when you place an order for, say, 25K 12TB drives...
 
Toshiba gives you 10% off as an educational institution, our secretary didn't want "to deal" so we lost a few thousand dollars. Then we lost another few hundreds because we were forced through CDW's drop shipping scam. CDW is effectively the only way to make non-rate limited purchases for computer equipment. CDW will mark the product up by $50 and order it from Amazon. Then they will rebox it. Except the original box was still left.
Also the reboxing results in a 2 day Amazon prime shipment taking two weeks...
 
9:29 PM
@Mikhail So it flipped again? Seagate is now reliable and WD is shit?
 
Both Seagate and WD are on the unreliable side of the spectrum compared to HGST or Toshiba. That being said HGST or Toshiba are less noticeable in the enthusiast built space.
From personal experience, WD, and specially WD reds have been a burning pile of crap. At least once, my WD Red Pro 6TB literally caught on fire.
 
Well then that 16TB Exo might be it. I'll probably get either 4 or 6 of them.
Need to do my spending spree before EOY.
 
moar
buy more storage
 
@Mikhail I'm also considering 16 or 24 of the WD blacks for my compute workstation. They're the only ones with the 5 year warranty and no TBW rating.
 
Get a RAID card for fun, then you can benchmark your stuff against the RAID card.
 
9:33 PM
@Mikhail Not to be mistaken for the anger you feel when a drive starts on fire, which would be stow-rage.
 
@Mikhail I have 17 x 2 TB Toshibas. One died last month from reallocated sectors.
The other one with the spin retry count "fixed" itself. The SMART no longer shows the spin retry. lol
The array is 16 of them. But I bought a spare expecting one to fail.
 
The BackBlaze reliability chart is pretty much taken as gospel.
 
@Mikhail They kinda earned it.
 
Most importantly, Toshiba failed zero times
Also the JBODs BackBlaze builds are pretty shit, can't even saturate a 10G link with 60 drives
 
@JerryCoffin ah the old "IsOnFire" environment flag
 
9:46 PM
@Mikhail ...but a total of fewer than 200 drives for less than 20,000 hours total. We'd expect zero failures from most of the drives if we have that few hours. Even the Seagate 4 TB (second worst in the chart) would only expect one failure in the same number of hours (so it would only take a tiny bit of good luck for it to have experienced zero failures as well).
 
@JerryCoffin Also learn to do division 13432/146= 92 (Toshiba) and 39374/383 = 102 (WD)
Also drive failure occurs mostly early on. Long term failure is typically due to the motor issues, and the double motor design of most enterprise drive effectively doubles the drives life times.
 
@Mikhail I can do division just fine, but I'm not sure what division you think you're trying to do here.
 
I pasted it
 
@Mikhail You pasted some numbers, but fail to tell us what you think those numbers represent. Also, half the numbers you pasted appear to apply to a WD drive, which I didn't even mention.
 
You'll notice that the amount of days the drives were running was mostly the same.
Anyways, the annual failure rate is the key metric
 
9:58 PM
@Mikhail It's a key metric when it's meaningful, but it's subject to all the usual problems of a small sample size. My point (which you've apparently still failed to comprehend) is that if you took that small a sample of the other drives (even the ones that are clearly pretty bad, such as the Seagate 4 TB), it wouldn't take a whole lot of luck for them to look just as good as the Tohibas do.
 
Nope, the statistical power for 200 samples is pretty high
 
is this true?
It is invalid C++ syntax to use non-constant integers to declare your array (you need to either use numbers for your size e.g., image[5][3]` or use constant integers e.g., const int WIDTH = 5; image[WIDTH][3]. Don't be fooled -- using variables may compile on your computer only because g++ has an extension to allow it. If you try to compile as a pure C++ program, it will fail`
 
@10Replies yeah, it's true
variable length arrays are not part of the c++ standard
there's std::vector and other containers for that stuff
 
10:14 PM
wack
C++ hurts me ;/
 
not really, most C guys learned to regret that feature
you can always just replace it with a call to alloca if you really need to
 
Reading the boost::zip_iterator documentation <- ಠ_ಠ
 
coming from python and java where this is a non issue, it hurts me
and javascript... but we don't talk about JS
 
Compared to C, C++ has a much better support of dynamic memory management
 
Oh yeah, I've heard that C is ever more painful lol
It's honestly a mistake to teach interested students more abstracted languages before lower level languages
 
10:25 PM
I don't really know about that. I really got a lot out of the lower-level stuff. But I think most frontend webdev guys can live a whole career without bothering about the details
 
Its hard to get them interested without teaching them more abstract languages
 
not much money in frontend webdev
 
Better than working in a coal mine
 
true
I started with perl and scratch
 
Oh hey. Now we have "Robert-gate"!
109
Q: Why was Robert Harvey suspended?

SklivvzRobert, one of the most important moderators of Stack Overflow recently resigned. I have noticed his account was suspended today. Normally I would not ask, but given the open accusations of having already unfairly demodded one moderator, and the uproar that generated, can you clarify the reas...

Maybe something to distract from pronoun-gate?
 
10:36 PM
12 hours ago, by TelKitty
The Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) was a social psychology experiment that attempted to investigate the psychological effects of perceived power, focusing on the struggle between prisoners and prison officers. It was conducted at Stanford University on the days of August 14–20, 1971, by a research group led by psychology professor Philip Zimbardo using college students. In the study, volunteers were randomly assigned to be either "guards" or "prisoners" in a mock prison, with Zimbardo himself serving as the superintendent. Several "prisoners" left mid-experiment, and the whole experiment was...
You don't know how much you are repressing people until you are on the repressed side.
With that said, Robert Harvey was probably one of the best moderators Stackoverflow ever had, not do I know much about moderators on this site.
I just know they used to send all their newbie moderators to the lounge for 'training' purposes, and get all of them scarred for life and never return here - a bit like to get juniors to do all the dirties and dangerous jobs in a workplace, a bit mean really.
 
11:18 PM
@Mikhail Not when you're trying to distinguish between a failure rate of (for example) 0.2% vs. .5%.
@Mysticial In this case, it does look like their action is at least marginally defensible. I'd say they overreacted, but there's at least some room for reasonable argument that his flagged comments were rude.
 

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