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12:06 AM
Noticed my code was using a pointer from a resource (OGL buffer) that had cudaGraphicsUnmapResources called on it. That pointer shouldn't be valid, but apparently everything is working fine. The pointer shouldn't go to valid memory when the resource is unmapped. Wonder if this is some exploitable vulnerability.
 
 
2 hours later…
1:48 AM
@sehe its up :D
 
 
6 hours later…
8:03 AM
@Mikhail it's more likely that the driver is lazy and doesn't update the page table until the buffer is actually deleted/purged from RAM/reused by other process
 
 
1 hour later…
9:13 AM
@Borgleader timing is eeeeeevrything
 
Ron
@StackedCrooked Hi, there seems to be some issues with the Coliru's https certificate on some browsers, so one needs to manually add the exception to the rule. Thought I let you know about this.
 
9:35 AM
@Ron Easy fix: use http :0
Also, looks fine to me - it's a Let's Encrypt job and it validates on my Chromium. What browser do you use? @Ron
 
Ron
9:52 AM
@sehe I use Chrome. Not sure what happens on Firefox.
 
 
1 hour later…
11:15 AM
Woke up by the sound of brush turkey ransacking the garbage bag this morning at this secluded campground. Ended the day by checking into this 3 bedroom airbnb house surrounded by 3 train lines that enclose the house like a triangle. I think this is the only residential building in this triangle, together with a few warehouses that no one lives in at night.
Why life, you so full of surprises?
 
@Ron That's the weirdest answer
 
@TelKitty I was literally initially imagining this house as literally the only thing inside of a triangle of train tracks with trains going around it constantly
 
11:35 AM
No train at night so far it seems. Saw 2 in the early evening.
The place is pretty decent for under $100 a night.
 
Ron
12:00 PM
@sehe Lol, indeed. What I meant was: I think I saw the same behavior on Firefox on Linux.
 
 
1 hour later…
1:15 PM
WorksForMe (Ubuntu 18.04)
Could it be time synchronization issues?
 
1:44 PM
 
 
4 hours later…
5:22 PM
have you seen the pattern matching by exceptions thing
I think it's pretty rad
 
@sehe Ehhh... I cant get it to compile. I copy pasted all of it into one file and all clang versions I found online + VS2017 are giving me compilation errors (something about a return type on VS2017 and <experimental/coroutine> not existing on godbolt) so I'm assuming it needs a special branch of clang.
(actually, i can get it to compile on VS with a small modification but then it gives the wrong result so its hardly any better)
 
5:42 PM
@StackedCrooked Seems a bit wimpy. Go for the Zombie Apocalypse.
 
oh nvm i missed an option
 
@Borgleader A phrase that could be a much bigger problem for a derivatives trader.
 
so true
 
also
If you are a car enthusiast at like at all
go watch VinWiki channel on YT
you won't be disappointed
 
5:58 PM
Why would anyone ever choose boost over Qt?
To me there is nothing better than Qt AFAIK
 
Boost.Signals substantially easier to build and deploy. Doesn't require meta-compilation for example.
 
@Mikhail Is this your only reason?
 
6:21 PM
@traducerad Boost is a UI library now?
 
@Mikhail Boost.Signals2 you mean :p
Boost and Qt are like two entirely different frameworks solving different problems except sometimes x)
 
@Morwenn What can you do with boost that you can't with Qt?
 
@traducerad as far as I know, there is nothing like Spirit in Qt
also coroutines
I'm not sure whether Qt offers much for metaprogramming
There are shittons of fundamental types and functions for maths in Boost to that I believe don't exist in Qt
 
@Morwenn doesn't Qt actually go further than just UI? QSocket, QSerial, etc...
 
@traducerad It does, but Boost has more fundamental low-level stuff that can be used to build other libraries on top of them
 
6:29 PM
@Morwenn About what are you thinking? I think there are very few people (relatively speaking) that eg realy need libs that eg can solve differential equations
 
@traducerad that problem is totally orthogonal to the question you asked v0v
 
@Morwenn I know I am just replying to you saying boost has interesting math functions. AFAIK Qt has enough math stuff for most of the "regular" programmers out there
 
There are plenty of users who need big integers, or even unit libraries, or even coroutines
Boost provides all that
 
6:45 PM
@Morwenn isn't the size of an int dependent on your hardware?
 
@traducerad by big integers I mean integers that are solely limited by the size of your memory
like the built-in integers in Python
 
I see
so ideally for those people you'd need to be able to combine Qt's widgets mechanism for the View part of your software, and Boost for your model and controller
 
it's not even about MVC, Qt and Boost are just orthogonal frameworks which happen to sometimes overlap x)
 
7:05 PM
@Borgleader seems likely
@Borgleader which one
 
@sehe -fcoroutines-ts
-std=c++2a -stdlib=libc++ -lpthread are also necessary
i somehow missed one in my copy paste from the makefile
(-lpthread i added because of link errors on godbolt)
 
@Borgleader ty
@Borgleader those make sense
@Borgleader since when does godbolt link
 
i unchecked one of the options on the assembly output pane and i got link errors somehow
about a dozen undefined reference errors to pthread_xyz
 
7:24 PM
weirdness. why link if they don't run anyways (there's LTO though)
 
7:49 PM
I need a gold batch in . Turns out I marked as dupe but guy neglected to tag the question as so my hammer didn't work.
0
Q: boost::asio::spawn with async_receive_from

debonairin my program, i want to call async_receive_from from spawn coroutine. Now, when does the coroutine will get finished or terminated? when work() will finish its execution? handler inside async_receive_from will again call async_receive_from to schedule next async call. When I call boost::asio::...

 
badge
 
That. :meek-blush:
 
@sehe I think its from the "Compile to binary and disassemble the output" button?
 
@traducerad completely different use cases
 
8:02 PM
i dont recall exactly i was justr trying different things (I temporarily forgot godbolt != coliru and was trying to see the output of the program)
 
8:15 PM
@BartekBanachewicz yes, this answer seems to resume it pretty well. People like to use Qt for the front end and boost for the backend
Although I always thought Qt was good enough to be used for both
 
8:26 PM
@Borgleader You don't usually need to link for that (again, LTO being the possible exception)
@traducerad Too many people thouht it was "good" like that, for the sheer reason that the framework was so intrusive that it was just too much work to not use it pervasively (same with MFC. Boy, the stuff I've seen)
 
@sehe "The" framework = Qt or Boost?
 
boost is not a framework
 
there's no "the" framework
there are frameworks and libraries and each have their use cases
 
@Morwenn to me it looks like a framework is just a bunch of libs
 
Ok. That'll pass with some experience.
 
8:43 PM
@sehe At the company where I work a framework was developed. That framework is basically a bunch of shared objects. And you just link against the ones you need, that s it. This is why I think so
 
That's not the usual way framework is used (that would be a set of libs indeed, at most an "SDK" - especially if it would have included tools/utilities to aid with the usage)
A framework presupposes structural components, supplying some of them (like plumbing) and you will have to work to fit in that mold. If you step outside, you'll expend energy to adapt.
A library (specifically, a good library) will allow you to "bring your own" and work with that. Like, Boost Asio does networking but doesn't mandate an event loop - you can bring / integrate into your own.
Libcurl doesn't mandate a specific way to create sockets. Instead you can take them from any source.
 
^ this
you "plug into" a framework, but a lib is more like a bag of lego bricks
 
I see, this clarifies quite some stuff
 
Qi doesn't mandate text encodings.
Boost Numeric doesn't require specific state types.
Boost String algos do not require certain string types to be used.
Boost Fusion specifically allows programs to adapt any type to be a generic sequence.
Boost Property Map allows you to completely decouple datastructures from attribute access/manipulation etc. etc.
OTOH, if you wish to use Qt algos, you cannot unless you use Qt containers. And many things simply won't work unless you derive from QObject. And if you want to avoid memory leaks, you have to conform to their (rather arcane) smart pointer conventions (I can't be too specific, because I stayed away from it, but I know enough from using MFC)
 
@sehe MFC -> Major Framework Catastophy? :P
 
8:50 PM
Nah. MFC = pretty cool library that allowed other vendors to approximate UI style like Microsoft's own applications (specifically, the SDI/MDI UI conventions).
It was pretty revolutionary in that sense, and very generous, for the same reason that Borland's TurboVision (and later ObjectWindows Library) were seminal
However, these days, vendor lock-in is not such a given, long-lived software is common, portable software and open source have become more normal, so you tend to get "better citizen" library design.
Of course, some of that is just luxury: the "nice" UI libraries (WPF?) sit on top of the dinosaur contraptions (GDI/GDI+). Much of it's still there, just hidden under better abstractions.
 
@sehe Actually, I believe WPF normally sits on top of D2D. But recent versions of MFC also suppose plugging int to do (at least your) drawing via D2D as well.
 
I admit I've not heard of D2D
I stay away from UI, especially GUI, and Windows in particular :)
But I know I'd use WPF if I had to
 
@sehe Sorry--Direct2D. The 2D derivative of/counterpart to (what used to be) Direct3D, but is now just DirectX, if memory serves.
 
Direct3D obviously rings bells. Not much of it positively (except for adoption and trademark long term support, I guess)
 
@JerryCoffin ISTR something of this nature from reading WPF4 Unleashed years ago
 
9:02 PM
What are your thoughts about DDS? I heard it is quite popular amongst some companies for their IPC
 
@sehe I found it to be quite a strong argument in favor of OpenGL.
 
This is a more interesting link perhaps: opendds.org/about/dds_overview.html
 
@JerryCoffin :)
 
Seems like a long time since anybody's posted any music links...
 
@traducerad just reminds me of IIOP, Corba, (D)COM+, JNI, RMI, DEC RPC, and in this day and age WebServices, WCF, WCS, OData all the way down to GraphQL etc. It's all middleware.
It's all pretty much equal to me though I'd hesitate to use anything that implies certain VMs without having tangible benefits.
I'd probably consider more lightweight options and more portable options before the others. (something like protobuf gets you a long way)
I suppose Web Services tried to do to SOAP (lol, Simple :)) what XBRL tries to do to XML data interchange.
 
9:08 PM
@sehe saw protobuf being used in a lot of open source projects. Seems to be very popular
 
It's nice if you're IBM and you really wanted to sell that gateway that translates between JSON and XML interfaces.
@traducerad I hate the API of generated code, but the strong suit is performance potential + widely portable support
Which is why it came to mind as an example. Actually many REST idioms have similar merit (thinking about HATEOAS here)
 
Seems like I am learning more here than at my current job lol
 
@JerryCoffin You have good memory for this.
 
I need to find a trick during job interviews whether the company I am applying at will be a place where I ll learn something
 
@traducerad You should have been here 2012-2016. Those were the days. I suggest cpplang slack or the Lounge discord these days
 
9:12 PM
I have the feeling you learn most by being surrounded by extremely competent colleagues
 
That is fact
 
Those competent people learn from other competent people, but at some point that chain stops... Now the question becomes what is at the source
geniuses who are able to disrupt techniques'industries/etc... ?
 
Doesn't really have to be "extremely". Just past the the "Mt. Stupid" peak in the curve and more experienced. Organizations need to have incentive to really try and "be better". IME it happens a lot sooner with smaller companies with experienced staff
 
Or is it just the fact that you put a bunch of more or less competent people together in a room that makes the trick
 
Larger companies obviously have loads of "extremely competent people" but
(a) it's harder to get in the right team
(b) it's easy for entire branches of the organization to get bogged down/complacent or even managed into ISO-certified bureaucracy instead of excellence
 
9:15 PM
@sehe Reinforced by listening to it fairly regularly. Mendelssohn really was a genius, and she plays it well.
 
@sehe Do you really believe experience is that much of a big deal? I know some extremely incompetent devs with 20 years of experience.... The most competent guy at our department has only 4 years of experience
 
@traducerad This is what makes me tick. I've done that even when I wasn't so experienced, and even when the environment did not encourage excellence.
 
Just before that, I was listening to Heifetz:
A much older recording, but my lord could he play.
 
Classic.
 
@sehe One of those less competent devs has more than 12 years of industry exp, but has never run GDB...
 
9:17 PM
@sehe Supposedly, after that performance, a lady said something to the effect that: "I'd give my life to play like that." His reply was supposedly something like "Thank you Ma'am. I did."
 
@JerryCoffin Two violinists that I love for similar reasons. They have a constant quality of tone and very consistent "breath" - never an inadvertant dip in the line. Even though stylisitcally they're ... decades apart of course
@traducerad Which makes sense if you do C#
@JerryCoffin oof
 
@sehe He has been writing C on linux platforms during 12 years
 
@sehe aaaaactually Qt algos are almost the only part of cute that has been deprecated in favour of the standard library :p
 
@traducerad C [:weeps:]
 
@sehe /r/learnprogramming as well nowadays? :p
 
9:19 PM
@Morwenn Qt tries really hard to modernize. They're an alright company, and they deliver extreme value. I'd use Qt if I had to do UI in C++. However, I'd firewall it off so it doesn't invade the core logic
@traducerad Dunno. I shun reddit. Perhaps unfairly
 
I seldom used Qt in C++, but I've constantly used PyQt at work
And by constantly I mean actually only for 3~4 jobs
I also used wxPython once
 
@sehe I enjoy the contrast between Heifetz and Perlman. Perlman is always so relaxed, he makes difficult passes sound almost easy. Heifetz makes the same passage seem impossible, even as he's doing it.
 
I sometimes wished a Python equivalent of Boost.Signals2 existed, but every standalone signals library doesn't properly handle multithreading
 
@traducerad There are various ways you can be challenged to learn.Highly competent colleagues is only one. Doing things nobody's done before, and (especially) most have pronounced impossible can get the creative juices flowing quite nicely as well.
 
@JerryCoffin Heifetz has the intensity of tone, both have the pinpoint accuracy. (Some of the same-era heroes, I'll never understand in this regard...)
Apr 2 '15 at 15:48, by sehe
I can recognize Isaac Stern by intonation alone
 
9:27 PM
Who are the (famous) software geniuses according to you nowadays? Besides Linus Torvalds and his rants
One of those very competent guys I know, is a very big fan of Lennart Poettering
@JerryCoffin True, I believe what you do at your 9-5 job is one thing. But what helps you get ahead of the curve is what you do past 5 pm
The way you incorporate the new knowledge you get (from colleagues or elsewhere) into new sideprojects
 
@traducerad I admire people who admire people like that. I'm missing the gene to even know/remember these people :(
I had to read his bio, and yes, that seems impressive - although there's a lot that people love to hate.
 
@sehe I'm not sure if I recognize him by intonation, or simply by the fact that there's a limited number of recordings (at least of my favorite pieces), and I've probably listened to every one of them at least a few dozen times. He's also extremely precise, but (like Perlman) a bit more relaxed, where Heifetz was all about the fire and intensity.
 
Apr 25 '16 at 22:31, by sehe
@CaptainGiraffe He's one of my turn-offs (a bit like Isac Stern on violin). I think Barenboim & Beethoven are the best of his discography yeah
You know. I just simply hate when intonation is sacrificed to increase brilliance.
It's a thing I have :(
I need to go sleep. Busy day ahead. Night all
 
@traducerad Dan Bernstein is certainly interesting. He's written quite a variety of stuff. Big problem is that there are so many niches, and if you don't happen to work in a particular niche, it's easy to miss a lot of really interesting work.
 
@sehe Night!
 
9:35 PM
@sehe G'night.
[Any bets on whether @sehe is still posting two hours from now?]
 
@traducerad I've run GDB a couple times and always wished I didn't have to
 
@JerryCoffin not this time
 
@sehe :-)
Sleep well.
 
10:23 PM
@Puppy At one point, I went through all the trouble of setting up Visual Studio to talk to a Linux box almost entirely so I could do the debugging inside of VS, and let it deal with gdb. Quite a bit of work, and not a minute of it wasted, given the available alternatives.
 
11:02 PM
That was 2.5 years ago. I still love both of you guys. Sehe any answer you provide is worthy of an upvote. Jerry, those longnecks.
@JerryCoffin I have the pleasure of remotely 'ssh -X' developing on a box with more than 10k cuda cores.
 
11:15 PM
@JerryCoffin That was fantastic
 
@JerryCoffin Also, if optimizations are enabled then you get variable optimized away almost for everything you're trying to read.
 

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