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8:44 PM
2
A: Branchless K-means (or other optimizations)

haroldToo bad we can't use SSE4.1, but very well then, SSE2 it is. I haven't tested this, just compiled it to see if there were syntax errors and to see whether the assembly made sense (it's mostly alright, though GCC spills min_index even with some xmm registers not used, not sure why that happens) i...

 
Ike
This is wonderful, and wow, you came up with it so quickly -- very impressed! I'll have to take some time to convert my structures to an SoA representation, but that should be quite doable. I very much appreciate the share and all the help here! I'll also try to post some updates about improvements. I wish I could accept multiple answers.
How do you come up with this stuff so fast? SSE intrinsics and assembly just flows out of your fingertips like a natural thought?
 
@Ike not entirely, I do have to look things up occasionally
 
Ike
Your solution offers promises of delights, working at under half the time of my original!!!!!! Unfortunately the results appear glitchy with certain centroids towards the end being unassigned. It may be a transcription error on my part, and I updated the post with your solution incorporated into it with a full example that can build. I'm reviewing the logic with a debug build to try to see if I can narrow down what went wrong. Nevertheless, if the glitch can be fixed and the times remain, it's amazing!!!
 
@Ike do you have a test case for that?
 
Ike
I should write some kind of proper test case. I was outputting results to a file as a crude way of making sure the results stay intact (with mercurial pointing out the diffs to me), and I was getting differences that appeared to be much more than FP differences. I'll see about adding proper testing for correctness at the end by making sure each point is actually associated to the nearest centroid.
 
8:44 PM
@Ike oh I just noticed, I fixed a bug in the assembly version that's still in the intrinsics version.. that's fixed now. If the problem was that it was off by 4, then that was it. Otherwise there are more bugs
 
Ike
Sweet! I was noticing in the debugger when comparing SIMD and scalar versions side-by-side that the first mismatch was on the 4th cluster.
One of the things I'm curious about, and I wish I could pick your brain a bit, is how you get your brain to manage thinking all vectorized like this. 4-way arithmetic I can manage, but when it comes to comparisons and bitmasks, my brain wants to shut down.
 
alright
it's just like an array of booleans you know
 
Ike
Cool! I'm very grateful for all your help so far. Yours offers the most promising benefits in terms of speed.
 
so it's like juggling a whole lot of bools at the same time and in a specific way
 
Ike
Do you think in terms of scalar logic first and then vectorize later? My brain might be wanting to do it all simultaneously and failing to decompose the problem properly.
 
8:46 PM
depends on the problem
I often go from the other side, kind of like numpy if you know what I mean? with the input being just a couple of gigantic vectors that I want to apply some operators between
that's not always applicable, obviously
but if you have that and a "reduce", then that already covers a lot of cases
 
Ike
I see -- I have to train my mind to working this way. BTW, with your swapping of instructions in place, I'm starting to get results that appear like they might be correct -- just some differences in the FP precision.
and with no degradation to the speed!
 
good
 
Ike
Is it common for SIMD to offer such a massive boost? I always heard it's like for 15%-30% speed improvements, not 200%. Then again this specific case might be somewhat pathological.
 
well as usual it depends.. it can be almost nothing, or a whole lot
or in between
for example if you're doing something with bytes, especially if it's something like a saturation addition (which is annoying in scalar code), then you can easily get over 1000% improvement
 
Ike
I have often thought we'd end up getting bottlenecked more quickly by memory-related issues than anything else with processing these massive arrays of things.
 
8:52 PM
otoh if the problem is some trivial operation on uint64_t's and the array is as big as the universe, there's not enough memory throughput for basically anything else to matter
the memory thing depends a lot on how much math happens per byte read/written
 
Ike
I see -- I think some of my previous failings in my attempts to vectorize were in that category -- too little work to do in each iteration
 
that's fairly common
 
Ike
Some of my struggles are just from a design standpoint with this stuff -- I find it very difficult to make an effective interface for an SoA rep for something like a mesh data structure, since it's not quite high-level enough to offer big algorithms to operate on always (sometimes it's just about fetching a vertex or polygon).
And we're in a case where we have to maintain ABI -- so it becomes difficult to achieve a stable interface quickly enough when I'm always changing my mind about how to represent the underlying data and can't quite make the interface invulnerable to the implementation details.
 
I don't know, I'm not that familiar with meshes
 
Ike
Ah sorry -- getting too much into specifics.. but I was tempted to try to make some set of class template that 'chain' together -- each one representing an SoA component, hooked together to form a bigger structure that can return some struct from the combination for some index, n.
Because we have use cases a lot where the daily kind of convenience code that isn't performance-critical wants just random access of single elements in a structured form.
But the really loopy and tight, bottlenecky code is often sequential and can vectorize and process 4 elements at a time.
 
9:01 PM
well of course you can sort of overlay an "array of structs"-view on top of it
 
Ike
Wonder if that's common practice or overkill -- like SoA<float>, SoA<float>, SoA<float> forming a consolidated interface that return the nth 'Vertex' in operator[] so that we have that normal kind of convenient access for daily code and then the SIMD-compatible SoA access for performance-critical sequential algorithms.
If so, I was thinking it could use that really awkward to program layout like:
xxxx yyyy zzzz xxxx yyyy zzzz
Which seems the tightest but really difficult to manage normally.
 
hm yea, uncommon
but not harmful
not a big win compared to 3 arrays though afaik
 
Ike
Might give it a shot! I have often found a big burden in trying to swap out underlying data structures, so something that translates a little more one-to-one less intrusively while offering the potential for SoA-type SIMD processing would be handy.
I see -- is it just because of the number of available cache lines? I thought in generalized form, such a rep might be useful if there's a lot of other stuff going on in the system at the same time to limit the cache lines available
 
usually when something else happens, L1 is basically trashed, it's annoyingly small
 
Ike
I don't really understand cache efficiency so well -- if it's possible to run into 'exhaustion' scenarios of this sort
I see -- in general I've recently just started kind of realizing that half of what I know is obsolete and that I've become a bit of a dinosaur
I'm used to working in an old codebase in a former project dating back to Amiga days that valued algorithms a lot more than concepts like cache efficiency
 
9:12 PM
ok well the thing with the cache misses is that ideally you'd have none, but the next best thing is a predictable stream (can be strided, but not by too much) where 100% of the data loaded is actually useful
that's for those "streaming type problems" anyway...
 
Ike
That's something I've been trying to factor in, especially with respect to data that might be better to hoist out of a structure and put to the side, since it's not frequently accessed
but for a time my previous workplace had this motto to avoid parallel arrays
and then here I find the SoA -- it's basically parallel arrays again
 
yes so there's the "split object down the middle" (so to speak) solution, SoA is basically the ultimate form of that
ah yes, it's often described as an anti pattern.. I suppose in some ways it is
 
Ike
I was tempted to use them a lot simply because of the extensibility -- of being able to add new data to the side without affecting the existing data -- but it does become a burden to synchronize
 
can't really help it though, as long as languages don't give a nice and useful way to say "layout this array of structs as SoA instead" there's going to be a trade-off there between being annoying to program and being a crappy layout
 
Ike
That's one thing I've always struggled with.. efficiency vs. maintenance and productivity
I like C++ because it feels like we could try to find a nice blend between those two
 
9:19 PM
you can sort of hide the ugly parts I suppose
 
Ike
Yeah -- or at least get them in a central place that's well tested and kinda generic
I have been exploring code generation a bit with LCC to see if we could find an easier way to generate the most devilishly efficient code on the fly -- since we have this nodal DSL to program things in the UI (somewhat like BluePrint in UE 4)
 
iirc FFTW does something like that or something, I'm not that clear on the details though
that's for FFTs only obviously, but my point is it could be done
 
Ike
It does seem to me like there's a shortage of languages to effectively express those kinds of low-level constructs, especially with respect to memory layouts, fixed allocation of types who sizes are known in advance, etc. Most seem geared about productivity and a lack of concern for these low-level details or native ones like C/C++ which still have you either leaning on the optimizer or somewhat fighting the language to do these things.
 
maybe Fortran or APL.. they seem ancient now of course, but they got some things right that seem to have been forgotten
 
Ike
I've noticed Fortran has some really powerful constructs for vector/matrix functionality
BTW, how do you utilize assembly? Do you primarily use GCC and link the code separately?
I'm always a bit paranoid about mixing assembly code -- like how does that interact with the optimizing compiler wanting to select what registers to use and so forth?
 
9:31 PM
vsyasm mostly, I use online GCC when I'm lazy
and well, it doesn't really interact with it (unless you use GCC's extended asm), the compiler just assumes that you killed all caller-save registers even if you didn't
 
Ike
oh I see, so it's at least safe.. I imagine that's not a problem if the logic inside is bulky enough
 
that's not so bad as long as the assembly code is a big loop or something like that
if it's a tiny function, it can be bad - it can't be inlined and so on
 
Ike
This info is pretty exciting! I apologize for the endless series of questions -- hope I'm not distracting you from something important.
I dabbled a bit in assembly in the early 90s -- but just to speed up certain video routines -- mode 13h type stuff.
And it was always by the book -- I never mastered anything -- tucked it away and used it after
but I would love to try my hand at it sometime
 
it has gotten easier in some ways
 
Ike
There still seems to be a lot of daily waste even armed with the optimizing C or C++ compiler -- like just the amount of things being done with the heap that could be done with the stack
 
9:36 PM
or well, maybe the problem was mostly in between, neither "back then" nor "now"
what I mean is, there were some processors for which writing fast code was really hard
but now processors are much more forgiving
 
Ike
For the most performance-critical of areas, it might be simpler to just link assembly code
 
for example for Core2, there were these crazy rules about reading more than 3 different registers too close together without writing to them but you could get away with if one of them was used as an index register.. the rules were crazy. Of course if you broke that rule, that only resulted in like 1 cycle of stall, but sometimes you had to care..
 
Ike
I see -- I might attempt some baby experiments with assembly this way -- if nothing else, it should help aid my attempts at understanding hotspots shown in the profiler a bit better
 
also on Core2, cacheline splits were so bad that it was worth doing the craziest things just to avoid them
 
Ike
there is this 3D software I idolize for its efficiency called ZBrush -- and apparently they have assembly coders there
I've attempted to reverse engineer some of what they are doing (not actually looking at assembly code) to try to figure out how they achieve their speed.. and I always initially started by assuming that they were doing something algorithmically far more complicated than they really were
I started converging towards similar results when I started simplifying the algorithms favoring cruder approximations and just tighter code
 
9:43 PM
ah yes, don't let stackoverflow hear it though, they go nuts if you say that the simpler algorithm was faster..
it's as if theoretical efficiency matters more to them than actual efficiency
 
Ike
It's somewhat of a struggle I have -- since I came from a similar background saying it's crazy to implement your own allocators, that algorithmic improvements are always the thing to focus on, that the optimizer is always right, etc.
So I know what it's like to think that way -- and recently the results I've been getting have been changing my mind.
 
it's probably one of the greatest myths in the programming scene
 
Ike
When it comes to things like raytracers and bulky mesh algorithms -- speed starts to become a critical factor -- maintenance and safety and so forth are always critical, but I run into cases where the user satisfaction scales almost proportionally with the improvements in certain areas
I think it was a good myth in my early days.. when I wanted to optimize without a profiler just for the sake of it, oblivious to the potential maintenance costs that would introduce
but now when I come across areas with a real need for tight efficiency, and with some experience to know I should apply discretion to my optimizations, the myth starts getting in the way
 
ok I have to go, nice talk though
 
Ike
cheers -- and so far your solution has given me the best results so I'm going to write some further tests to make sure it's all working okay, but I'm leaning towards accepting yours. Your help is much appreciated!
 
9:51 PM
alright, I hope it works
if not I may fix it tomorrow
 
Ike
I'm going to try to break down the logic too -- specifically intrinsics like _mm_castps_si128 and _mm_or_si128 which I never encountered before -- so I'll try to get a proper understanding of what you did by that time.
I'll do my homework -- cheers!
 

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