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12:49 AM
@giuliolunati Yes, there are a few remaining that should be changed, but I couldn't think of what to call the "right answer". The most standardized file typing system is MIME, which has a rather loose mapping to file extensions.
Even once there's a proper content-type or other operation to use, there should likely still be an EXISTS? that is boolean.
 
 
3 hours later…
3:53 AM
@giuliolunati Great, so someone knows about it. Adapting it to ren-c is (was :-) on my todo list, but you know, priorities ... So, thank you for doing it. I will check it out soonish.
 
 
2 hours later…
5:55 AM
I included Rebol3 on a benchmark of interpreter startup times, I'll probably add ren-c here in a bit. gist.github.com/acook/6420543
Okay, updated with ren-c
The purpose of the benchmark is to test for command responsiveness. The original impetus was for writing quick-executing scripts which could be used to generate prompts (in bash, zsh, fish or these days in powershell) with very low latency.
Much to my surprise, ren-c's init/quit cycle is phenomenally slower than r3, and is in fact much slower than any other interpreter's startup time except Ruby.
I'm really curious as to why that might be.
 
6:19 AM
@AnthonyMichaelCook Did you build a release build?
I would hardly be surprised if you built a debug build and it was slow. :-)
 
I built every interpreter according to their defaults
 
I do ask people, unless they have a good profiling reason to do so, to do debug builds. Because it is more informative. But if you insist on doing a performance test, please do an -O2 -DNDEBUG
Ren-C is more complex in general than R3-Alpha, and I've fought tooth and nail to make the sophistication not cost orders of magnitude in performance.
It was forked from Atronix, which was forked from Saphirion, which meant a bit of baggage to start with. The choice to build from a de-GUI'd version of their work was deliberate. It irked earl and others who thought Saphirion and Atronix had "heavied" things up, but I felt the long term success would be best bet on industry.
 
Is there a release tag in the makefile? I don't see one.
 
@AnthonyMichaelCook Anyway, if you modify the makefile, use a "-DNDEBUG -O2" build, and see if it truly is worse.
If you are using CMake, but you probably aren't.
@AnthonyMichaelCook Depending on your familiarity with GNU make, or not, there are two lines you might pay attention to. RAPI_FLAGS and HOST_FLAGS would be the ones I'd suggest, and if you don't add -DNDEBUG and switch whatever -O setting you are set to to -O2, it's an unfair comparison.
 
Yeah I found it
The change was statistically insignificant
 
6:30 AM
@AnthonyMichaelCook Well did you make clean etc?
I guess if you want to do a profiling thing, and ask why one thing is faster or slower than another, I'm game for it.
Fact is, I've studied the thing pretty well.
 
At least it doesn't take long to recompile
 
And I know, there's overhead, of doing things correctly. See Atronix Slide Deck. I've kcachegrinded the thing into the ground, really.
 
I ran make clean, I'm using the latest code from github.
 
Ok, so what's your profiling test?
 
The source code is linked above. It only tests startup/teardown.
It's basically ren-c --do "quit"
 
6:34 AM
Ok, well, I can optimize for that metric.
But I won't.
Why do you care about that?
 
I explained it above.
It's for embedding in something that needs low latency. The first use case I had was for displaying prompts on the commandline.
It's a common enough concern for command-line utilities, but I think only Bash and Perl have explicitly optimized for it. Lua, which I just added to the suite today, really surprised me too.
 
Well, it's a new test. I guess, trying to make the --do "quit" case fast is something that could be added in the "realm of concern"
 
The purpose is just to see the speed an interpreter can set up and tear down. It's the overhead cost of doing business with that interpreter.
 
@AnthonyMichaelCook FWIW, R3-Alpha had no concept of "tear down"
e.g. no ability to clean up after itself.
 
It's hard to notice the latency in any of the interpreters that rank above Python, it seems virtually instantaneous.
 
6:40 AM
You couldn't embed it, and shut it down, and spin it up, with guaranteed balance of memory etc.
 
The OS does the cleanup in this case, but I can see how that would concern ren-c where it wouldn't concern r3.
 
Well, the point was to be able to be inited and shut down. Zero leaks.
And that's not free, but, it also shouldn't cost that much so if you've come back after a year or so of silence and decided to introduce a new benchmark, ok. But give us a bit of time to process the new benchmark.
Also, I'm on vacation.
 
I'm certainly not demanding anything of you, I was just sharing the table for anyone who might be interested in interpreter startup times. I added ren-c after I posted it, an hour ago, with no ulterior motive. But it did make me curious when I saw it.
 
@AnthonyMichaelCook Well, I'm ok with it being in the test suite, I just hadn't really thought of it as relevant yet.
I can do profiling specifically on the do-nothing-but-quit case, and see what's happening.
@AnthonyMichaelCook Push Red on this, it's something they should look at too.
 
I know bash, perl, and lua optimize their startup times. Bash because so many shells get created and perl because it's used for string processing from the commandline a lot, while lua because it doesn't want to be accused of slowing down the host process. ren-c has some overlap with perl and lua in those respects, so it might be something worth considering.
I don't think it's an end or world scenario or high priority. For the narrow case of having it in my PROMPT_COMMAND/precmd I'd probably use r3-alpha.
Hmm, let me see if I have Red laying around here.
 
6:54 AM
@AnthonyMichaelCook Well if startup/shutdown of Ren-C is significantly lower than that of R3-Alpha, it becomes a point of study for me, when I have... study time. I don't think there's anything really intrinsic that should slow that down.
I'll look at it, but it is 1:00 AM and I'm traveling...
So, maybe I won't look at it tonight or tomorrow, but I will look at it.
 
I should also add Wren and some of the other scripting languages I have around here to the table.
Red isn't a perfect match because I can't run it inline, but I can compare a binary versus clang.
Ouch. Red takes a pretty big hit too. Only slightly faster than Python in this test.
 
@AnthonyMichaelCook Well, I will put the benchmark in the list of "things someone might consider a reason to care about a programming language". And see what I can do, and let you know. Got to sign off now though, g'nite.
 
@HostileFork No worries. Sleep well.
 
 
3 hours later…
10:15 AM
Beginners question (to answer on https://github.com/metaeducation/ren-c/blob/master/README.md ?)
When I followed this instruction ( make -f makefile.boot ) on this Windows machine I happened to pass by I got:
'make' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.
 
 
3 hours later…
12:58 PM
@iArnold Windows does not include linux commands by default. Generally, I believe people use MinGW, and with that installed it would be mingw32-make -f makefile.boot
 
@iArnold or use Cygwin
 

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