« first day (1402 days earlier)   

12:03 AM
@HostileFork Samsung Galaxy phones are waterproof.
 
12:41 AM
They have upgraded water in the US, so it doesn't cause damage to electronics anymore!
 
 
1 hour later…
1:46 AM
@kealist Well then there is magnetic water, which won't damage electronics, but might have other unintended effects. Not downloaded to the US yet.
 
2:13 AM
No one has better ideas about the parse thing?
At one point, explaining Rebol was that it was kind of a "new assembly" and so the more important goal was consistency and fitting various factors together vs. the idea of making the language all that ergonomically usable for the average programmer... because "dialects"
Which makes us ask if that argument spirals outward to the point where PARSE missing a characteristic that can say parse is such a core dialect that it can miss the mark on basic usability issues for common tasks because "dialects"
 
Welcome to the Rebol and Red room. See our FAQ.
 
So when I call out something like asking why one cannot literately extract "abc$$def" and get the "abc" and "def" out, then one can either consider that a failure needing attention or just that you are using an imperative machine with a certain shape and the tool either does or does not fit that shape.
Hello @TristanDube ... Rebol and Red had a conference in Montreal of all places. :-)
My statements above should not be taken out of context. Rebol and Red can certainly get "abc" and "def" out of "abc$$def" :-P
I am just talking about syntax design
And saying it should require N fewer characters in the domain specific language for extracting information from series data (strings, blocks, etc) than it currently does.
@RebolBot
parse "In [Rebol] and [Red] the Parse dialect is how we extract data, not RegEx" [
    some [
        thru "["
        copy name to "]"
        (print name)
     ]
]
print "You kind of have to know what we're working on to get it."
 
; Brought to you by: try.rebol.nl
Rebol
Red
You kind of have to know what we're working on to get it.
 
 
8 hours later…
10:16 AM
@HostileFork thanks for fixing the FAQ link
I've been reading the curecode discussion on until with interest
 
11:16 AM
the most usefull pattern for novices (even if some devs objected) - is TO/THRU multiple
well, imo of course :-)
 
 
4 hours later…
3:33 PM
Wee XSL experiment: Google Groups Feed; Rebol Forum Feed; StackExchange Q/A Feeds. I suspect different browsers handle these links in different ways, however if they process XSLT then they'll look a little like this:
 
chomp: copy var to "$$" CHOMP
that's too ridiculous
 
4:29 PM
Maybe the solution is a keyword that just repeats the immediate unit (string!/integer!/whatnot!) before
we probably need a whatnot! datatype as well
 
 
4 hours later…
8:17 PM
@kealist That did cross my mind, I thought about REMATCH
But I don't really see it adding to clarity of what is happening
COPY VAR TO REMATCH "$$" => COPY VAR TO "$$" "$$"
It's less comprehensible
It's really too bad because COPY VAR UNTIL "$$" seemed like a nice way of saying it, and it reads well as a literal, but it just doesn't work as COPY VAR UNTIL RULE.
 
8:32 PM
Yeah, maybe without using COPY, UNTIL just throws an error
copy var to rule jump
 
>> parse "abcd$$efg" [ copy something to "$$" (? something) to end ]
 
; Brought to you by: try.rebol.nl
SOMETHING is a string of value: "abcd"
== true
 
How about a pseudo refinement
 
copy/past
 
parse does not support refinements, no?
 
8:37 PM
parse "abcd$$efg" [ copy something to/thru "$$" copy rest to end ]
?? rest
== "efg"
 
out of the many possible idioms, you guys choosed the most easy one. Not worth even thinking about imo ...
to/thru multiple was much trickier for novices to get right.
 
@pekr no, but we can make it look as though it's a refinement
 
that might be a solution ...
but not sure if Carl did not want to keep 'parse clean off the refinements intentionaly?
 
@pekr who knows ... he doesn't communicate anymore with us.
And we have to evolve
 
I need to get back into programming again. Haven't done any for almost two months now
Chickens, eh?
 
8:50 PM
I haven't been doing any programming lately, either
Answering questions here and there. Some puzzle solving for fun
@Ladislav showed back up, never said where he went off to...
 
9:08 PM
@kealist Decided not PC in view of events in the middle east
 
@HappySpoon Ah.
 
@HappySpoon Are you stuck again on your chat client?
 
@kealist No, just lost enthusiasm
And I'm in the middle of house renovations so don't have any continuous spare time
 
We finally cleaned out our storage unit on Sunday, so once my car is cleared out, the moving process is done
I image renovating is just as much fun
 
Renovating is more fun.
I found another unfinished song in hard drive zero project and thought about finishing it, and got a bit hung up on it
 
9:18 PM
Have to figure out what to do with furniture that no longer matches
 
I think I am just going to delete the vocal tracks and consider it done
 
Also trying to determine whether I can build a solar air heater
 
vocals aren't necessary
 
I was trying to rap, it wasn't coming out well
 
At the maker faire some guy was wanting to build mirror arrays to point into his windows to warm his house up. Doesn't sound like a good idea
 
9:20 PM
@kealist why not?
 
My wife is more familiar with the r-values and such involved
 
Do you mean a heliostat?
 
Why point in the windows and not focus the heat on black inflammable slabs of some kind?
 
I was thinking of something like this solarwall.com/en/home.php
which is a transpired solar collector
 
I can double-check what she said, but I think the cost vs efficiency of doing that didn't seem like it made much sense
 
9:23 PM
basically air is pulled through 1000s of tiny holes in a black metal mesh, and strips the heat off. Thermosiphon pulls the air up into the building.
No glazing required.
 
and having a bunch of light through your windows sounds terrible
 
Then there's the "setting your curtains on fire" part
Which is only fun for a little while
 
well, with this technology you have the mirrors ( or snow ) reflecting onto the collectors
@HostileFork Not going to happen with mirrors unless they're concave
Since the collectors are hard against the wall, they also collect heat lost from the building.
 
@HappySpoon Depends on how sunny it is that day
 
@HostileFork In a climate where you'd need to do this, it ain't going to happen.
 
9:26 PM
A supernova is a stellar explosion that briefly outshines an entire galaxy, radiating as much energy as the Sun is expected to emit over its entire life span, before fading from view over several weeks or months. The extremely luminous burst of radiation expels much or all of a star's material at a velocity of up to 30,000 km/s (10% of the speed of light), driving a shock wave into the surrounding interstellar medium. This shock wave sweeps up an expanding shell of gas and dust called a supernova remnant. A great proportion of primary cosmic rays comes from supernovae. Supernovae are more energetic...
 
but anyway, if you're worried, you can turn the helostats facing the neighbours instead
 
You need to be careful of focusing that on your curtains, concave or otherwise.
 
The solar wall is interesting as the plates are modular
so you just clip them on one by one to get the height you need. But they're more designed for large buildings and not air tight modern homes.
1 m2 of mirror is not going to produce more then 1kwh of energy into your house at the best of times.
 
Better to evolve so you don't care what temperature it is. That's useful lots of places. Saves on energy costs, too.
 
Really looks like overkill
A PV panel on the roof and some extra lights would be better than this thing.
 
9:38 PM
Funny, I knew a guy in LA who was really earnestly trying to come up with a business for running light through buildings via mirrors...effectively so you could be on the first floor of a tall building and have a skylight channeled through conduit from the outside
 
they have solatubes, but the amount of light is related to the capture area
so, not useful
 
His main job is as a PHP programmer I think.
 
9:57 PM
@HostileFork That would explain why he does things the hard way.
 
 
1 hour later…
11:15 PM
I think it's a metaphor for designing a full stack language from scratch!
 

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